Programme And Module Handbook
 
Programme Specification


Date Specification Approved
College College Arts and Law
School Eng, Drama, & Creative Studies
Department Eng Lang and Linguistics
Partner College and School History
Collaborative Organisation and Form of Collaboration
Qualification and Programme Title B.A. English and History Full-time
Programme Code 946D
Delivery Location Campus
Language of Study English
Length of Programme 3 Year(s)
Accreditations This programme has no outside accreditations
Aims of the Programme In collaboration with partners across the College of Arts and Law, this programme will offer students the opportunity to study a JH degree, one half of which will be EITHER English Literature OR English Language.

The wide range of reasoning, research, independent learning, communication and organisational skills acquired from this programme equips graduates to pursue further study or employment in English and related disciplines, and is readily transferable to a wide range of commercial, cultural and professional careers.

Aims for the Literature Pathway:
1) a wide study, methodologically and theoretically informed, of the range of literature in the English language from the medieval period to the present;
2) through study of the range, kinds, structure and character of literature in the English language it aims to produce individuals who possess a broad range of knowledge and understanding of English literature and performance;
3) to instil in students critical skills in the close reading and analysis of texts both literary and non-literary; responsiveness to the central role of language in the creation of meaning; rhetorical skills of effective communication and argument, both oral and written;
4) to provide students with bibliographic skills appropriate to the discipline;
5) to provide students with an understanding of the role of cultural norms in understanding and judgement;
6) to provide students with awareness of how different social and cultural contexts affect the nature of language and meaning.

Aims for the Language Pathway:
1) To provide students with in-depth study of the ways in which the English language can be described; the ways in which it has changed over time; variation in language use, the ways in which language is acquired by both native and non-native speakers, and the study of language use in different social contexts.
2) As students progress through the programme, they will have the chance to study a range of more specialised and applied modules, looking for example at the relationship between language, gender and identity, the way language is processed in the mind, everyday creativity, the role of English in new media, and the teaching of English.
3) To develop research skills in English Language.

This programme provides students with the opportunity to combine study of the human past with that of another discipline in equal proportions. This specification refers to the credits that a Joint Honours History student will pursue under the jurisdiction of the Department of History during each year of his/her programme (60 in the first year and between 40 and 80 in years 2 and 3). The credits acquired at each level from the other Joint Honours discipline is detailed in the relevant department’s own documentation. The History programme aims to enhance students’ knowledge and understanding of historical events and processes, as well as to develop analytical and critical capacities of a high order. Though the programme concentrates on medieval and modern Europe including Britain and Ireland (c.400-c.2000), considerable attention is also paid to global history, particularly that of Asia, Africa and North America. Students studying History as a joint degree will have the opportunity to study the full range of periods and areas offered by the Department of History. Students will be able to study history of varying types and approaches, including at least some of the following: political, social, economic, cultural, religious, military and diplomatic. Joint Honours graduates will display a broad knowledge over two disciplines and be able to demonstrate intellectual versatility and organisational flexibility. The History half of the Joint Honours programme aims to produce graduates with an enthusiastic appreciation of the past, the skills with which to research and analyse the past, an ability to engage c
Programme Outcomes
Students are expected to have Knowledge and Understanding of: Which will be gained through the following Teaching and Learning methods: and assessed using the following methods:
The primary trends in the political, social, economic, cultural and religious development of western Europe during the medieval and/or modern periods;
A body of historical information characterised by geographical range and chronological depth with special attention to western Europe;
A range of sources available to historians (including textual primary evidence) and an awareness of their limitations;
The historiographical development of core debates in history, and an appreciation of the reasons for continued controversies;
Some of the core analytical skills deployed by historians, including skills of interpretation, corroboration and evaluation;
Some of the conceptual, theoretical and ideological influences on historical events and on their interpretation, with particular emphasis on political, cultural and socio-economic development.
LITERATURE PATHWAY:
A substantial number of authors and texts from different periods of literary history
Different critical and theoretical approaches in the study of literature, language and performance, and of the literary, cultural and historical contexts that inform both the writing and reading of texts and performance
Study of the works of Shakespeare.
Thematic and generic links between texts across a wide historical range.
LANGUAGE PATHWAY:
One or more specialised area(s) of English Language and Linguistics: its theories, historical varieties, methods of discovery and major conceptual paradigms;
The history and development of the English language, or the grammar, syntax and lexis of Old English, and the critical and cultural frameworks within which it is studied;
Analytic practices in the description of the English language and traditions in linguistic theory;
The variation of English language in different situational and developmental contexts and the theoretical frameworks within which such variety is studied;
The grammar, discourse and lexis of varieties of English and critical and cultural frameworks within which such variation is studied.
Lectures, seminars, group research projects and virtual learning environments
Lectures and seminars; Dissertation or extended essay supervision; Student-led seminars; Independent study in groups and individually; Formative written exercises; Presentations.
Written formative and summative coursework of varying length and type, from short source exercises to essays of up to 3000 words each; unseen timed examinations; collaborative and/or individual research projects
Group presentation; Individual assignment/essay; Pre-released examination; Unseen examination; Dissertation or extended essay; Independent study
Students are expected to have attained the following Skills and other Attributes: Which will be gained through the following Teaching and Learning methods: and assessed using the following methods:
Cognitive/intellectual skills:
display awareness of and empathy for historical context;
assimilate and synthesise historical evidence;
understand the process of historical validation and its limitations;
evaluate historical evidence and arguments;
draw reasoned conclusions from contested historical evidence;
formulate questions and hypotheses of interest and importance to historians, including those which entail comparative analysis over time and /or space;
evaluate and apply historical concepts and models;
understand relevant methods and concepts from other related disciplines, such as, for example, archaeology, economics and sociology, and apply them where appropriate to the study of history;
exercise intellectual autonomy.
Practical/transferable skills:
record information accurately and efficiently;
work confidently with elementary IT packages aimed at supporting the retrieval and presentation of information;
interpret and analyse information of various formats and types, including printed and non-printed texts;
identify, collect, synthesise and evaluate information from a range of sources;
plan and execute a collaborative research project;
communicate ideas and arguments effectively both orally and in writing;
exercise disciplined imagination in response to problems;
display intellectual flexibility in the face of reasoned argument;
work effectively under time-constraints;
work constructively as part of a team;
show a capacity for independent working;
engage in self-evaluation in order to construct and pursue individual learning goals and personal development objectives.
LITERATURE PATHWAY
Engagement with texts, primary and secondary: By the end of L C: the ability to demonstrate confidence in studying whole novels, plays, poems and films of different kinds and lengths; By the end of L I: the ability to read, with understanding, literary texts from different periods and genres; By the end of L H: the ability to synthesise a wide range of primary and secondary reading and the ability to range independently in their reading beyond prescribed texts in order to diversify and contextualise their study.
The capacity to analyse and critically examine diverse forms of discourse, both literary and non-literary, including own work and the work of peers: By the end of L C, the ability to apply notions of genre through interpretive practice and close reading. By the end of L I, the ability accurately to locate literary texts in relevant historical and generic contexts; and to analyse the literary effects produced by different types of intertextuality; By the end of L H, the ability to choose appropriate modes of analysis and apply them effectively to primary texts in the course of a piece of independent research.
The capacity for independent thought and judgement, and the ability to handle information and argument in a critical and self-reflective manner. By the end of L C, the ability to discuss the rationale for key differences between university-level literary study and the methods and expectations experienced at earlier stages of education; By the end of L I, the ability to construct arguments informed by, but not dependent upon, secondary material; By the end of L H, the ability to construct detailed, balanced and substantiated critical arguments; and to locate those arguments in their appropriate scholarly fields.
Skills in critical reasoning, and the ability to apply and critique systems of analysis and interpretation. By the end of L C, the ability to apply selected critical / theoretical approaches to the reading of literary texts. By the end of L I, the ability to distinguish between and use appropriately different critical approaches; By the end of L H, the ability to evaluate the relative merits of a range of critical/theoretical points of view. The ability to formulate appropriate research questions, undertake large scale substantive research, apply relevant methodologies and sustain an argument through a lengthy piece of individual project work.
The ability independently to use libraries, catalogues, bibliographies and other appropriate reference sources; to make appropriate use of the internet, the e-library, the physical library and other appropriate libraries; and to choose and use suitable editions of literary texts, applying a basic understanding of textual transmission.
The ability to document, cite and present, according to an agreed stylesheet of scholarly written work. Effective skills of communication both written and oral, and the ability to apply these in appropriate contexts, including the ability to present sustained and persuasive written and oral arguments cogently and coherently; the ability to write correctly and effectively in appropriate academic prose and to apply an understanding of the qualities valued in a literary essay.
The ability to work with and in relation to others through the presentation of ideas and information and the collective negotiation of solutions.
The ability to acquire substantial quantities of complex information of diverse kinds in a structured and systematic way, to sift and organise material independently and critically, and evaluate its significance.
Information technology skills that contribute to digital literacy such as word-processing and the acquisition, use and critical evaluation of data in electronic formats.
Time-management and organisational skills, as shown by the ability to plan and present conclusions effectively in unseen examinations, the ability to carry out a substantial piece of independent research and to present it in writing, and the ability to budget time and prioritise work to meet deadlines.
LANGUAGE PATHWAY:
The capacity to analyse and critically examine diverse forms of discourse, and from both readerly and writerly perspectives;
The capacity for independent thought and judgement, and the ability to handle information and argument in a critical and self-reflective manner;
Skills in critical reasoning, and the ability to apply and critique systems of analysis and interpretation, and to synthesise practical and theoretical insights gained across modules on all levels;
The ability independently to use libraries, catalogues, bibliographies and other reference sources and resources of all kinds, both printed and electronic;
The documentation, citation and presentation of scholarly written work, and of appropriately formatted writing;
Effective skills of communication, both written and oral, and the ability to apply these in appropriate contexts, including the ability to present sustained and persuasive written and oral arguments cogently and coherently, and to apply drafting and redrafting skills to ‘industry specific’ writing and publishing tasks;
The ability to work with and in relation to others through the presentation of ideas and information and the collective negotiation of solutions;
The ability to acquire substantial quantities of complex information of diverse kinds in a structured and systematic way, to sift and organise material independently and critically, and evaluate its significance;
Information-technology skills such as word-processing, and the acquisition, use and manipulation of data in electronic formats;
Time-management and organisational skills, as shown by the ability to plan and present conclusions effectively.
Cognitive/intellectual skills: Lectures and seminars provide opportunities to demonstrate and practise the intellectual skills specified. Documentary work, introduced at level C and practised at level I via Group Research and the Optional module, and, particularly, in Special Subjects at level H, develops cognitive and analytical capacities to engage critically with primary source evidence in order to evaluate historical arguments. Historical Reflections requires students to reflect on the intellectual and conceptual aspects of historical inquiry. Essays allow for a specific focus on problem-solving as well as an opportunity to develop skills of assimilation, synthesis and analysis. For specific details of the delivery of learning outcomes in individual modules see the appended curriculum map.

Practical/transferable skills: Appropriate bibliographic guidance and support are supplied at all levels and for all modules by module convenors and/or module tutors. The Research Seminar at level C develops recording skills and information retrieval skills. In addition students are encouraged to take advantage of training offered by the library and information services in the use of bibliographical search tools and applications for IT. Practical research and presentation skills (both oral and written) are developed in most modules (in the context largely of the relevant secondary literature) via preparation for and participation in seminars for knowledge-based modules. The skills required to analyse and interpret documents effectively are introduced in the level C Research Seminar, developed in Group Research and/or level I Optional modules and practised at an advanced level in Special Subjects at level H. Group Research offers opportunities for collaborative and independent study. Regular submission of written work, as well as seminar preparation and discussion, improves reasoning, communication and organisational skills. Repeated exposure to deadlines for formative and summative assessment, as well as seminar deadlines, also encourages acquisition of time-management skills. Progress Review Tutorials provide a regular context for self-evaluation. For specific details of the delivery of learning outcomes in individual modules see the curriculum map.
Lectures and seminars; Individually supervised dissertation at LH; Peer-review of formative essays and formative presentations.
Cognitive/intellectual skills: Verification strategies employed include written coursework of varying length and type (including essays and contextualisation of documents), oral and written presentation of the group research project, open paper examination, and unseen timed examinations. For specific details of the learning outcomes targeted (and assessed) in individual modules see the curriculum map.

Practical/transferable skills: Verification strategies employed include written coursework of varying length and type (including essays and contextualisation of documents), oral and written reports on the group research project, unseen timed examinations and an open paper examination. For specific details of the learning outcomes targeted (and assessed) in individual modules see the curriculum map.
Group presentation, Individual assignment/essay; Pre-released examination; Unseen examination; Dissertation or extended essay; Independent study