Programme And Module Handbook
 
Programme Specification


Date Specification Approved
College College Arts and Law
School Phil, Theology and Religion
Department Philosophy
Partner College and School English Literature
Collaborative Organisation and Form of Collaboration
Qualification and Programme Title B.A. English Literature and Philosophy Full-time
Programme Code 7495
Delivery Location Campus
Language of Study English
Length of Programme 3 Year(s)
Accreditations This programme has no outside accreditations
Aims of the Programme The range of analytical, research, independent learning, communication and organisational skills acquired in this half of the programme equips graduates to pursue further study or employment in English and related disciplines The programme develops skills which can be utilised in a wide range of careers.

Students engage with the range of literature in English from the medieval period to the present day, with a concentration on literature from the British Isles. The programme aims to develop a broad knowledge and understanding of English literature. Students acquire critical skills in the close reading and analysis of literary texts, rhetorical skills of effective communication and argument, both oral and written, bibliographic skills appropriate to the discipline; an understanding of cultural norms; and an awareness of how different social and cultural contexts affect the nature of language and meaning.

The programmes provide a structure in which each level builds on the skills and knowledge acquired in the previous stage. First-year foundation modules in literature equip students with knowledge and methods to enable them to undertake their own learning. The programme offers a wide range of modules on different topics and periods of literature over the three years. There is a choice of focused final-year options, some of which provide a route to graduate study at the University of Birmingham. The programmes aim to provide students with an understanding and appreciation of central areas of philosophy, its methods and history. It aims to engage their interest in and enthusiasm for issues of philosophy and to foster within them the skills distinctive of good philosophy in particular, the abilities to:
  • analyse abstract claims and arguments accurately,
  • present their own views verbally and in writing, clearly and with supporting argument
  • collaborate with others in the course of such analyses and presentations
The programmes aim to provide students with the opportunity to engage with the range of expertise and internationally recognized research undertaken in the Dept. of Philosophy. Through these various aims and provisions, the programmes will enrich the lives of students who take them, and will provide society with the resource of graduates who can think and express their thoughts in a clear and logical manner. Graduates equipped with these transferable skills as well as with the knowledge of the subject’s contents will be employed in a wide range of occupations.

Programme Outcomes
Students are expected to have Knowledge and Understanding of: Which will be gained through the following Teaching and Learning methods: and assessed using the following methods:
The texts, theories and arguments of some of the major analytical philosophers, both past and present.
Some central theories and arguments in some of the core areas of analytical philosophy: metaphysics, epistemology, philosophy of mind, and moral and political philosophy.
Some theories and arguments that are the subject of current research in contemporary analytical philosophy
A range of techniques of philosophical reasoning, and how those techniques are brought to bear on philosophical theories and problems.
Basic logical notation and proof procedures, and of the most important ways in which those techniques inform analytic philosophy in general.
A substantial number of authors and texts from different periods of literary history, including a proportion from periods before 1800 in the original language, and of the principal literary genres relating to those periods.
Different critical and theoretical approaches in the study of literature, and of the literary, cultural and historical contexts that inform both the writing and reading of texts.
Study of the works of Shakespeare.
Thematic and generic links between texts across a wide historical range.
Lectures, tutorials, seminars discussion, independent study, close crucial reading of texts, the design and construction of essays and other assessments
Lectures and seminars (L C, I and H). An individually supervised dissertation at LH.
Exams, essays, coursework exercises, project work
Assessment at Level C is predominantly by a mix of unseen examination (including MCQs) and assessed essay with an element of assessment by group bibliography.

Level I assessment is by unseen examination and assessed essay or project.

A major dissertation is a feature of Level H, which also offers assessment by extended essay and by seen (pre-release) examination depending on the modules chosen by the student.
Students are expected to have attained the following Skills and other Attributes: Which will be gained through the following Teaching and Learning methods: and assessed using the following methods:
To interpret philosophical writing from a variety of ages and traditions
To analyse positions and arguments
To present cogent arguments in defence of their views, verbally and in writing
To understand and use a range of specialised philosophical terminology
To display independent understanding of philosophical views and arguments, and to work independently - including devising and researching pieces of philosophical writing of various lengths – and in groups
To communicate, and organise their studies, effectively
The capacity to be competent and effective users of IT resources for research purposes, word processing. Students will also be able to use IT communication tools effectively
Engagement with texts, primary and secondary
The ability to examine critically diverse forms of literary discourse, including one’s own work and the work of one’s peers
The capacity for independent thought and judgement, and the ability to argue in a critical and self-reflective manner
Skills in critical reasoning, and the ability to apply and critique systems of analysis and interpretation
The ability to formulate appropriate research questions, to undertake large-scale substantive research, to apply relevant critical methods and to sustain an argument through a lengthy individual project.
The ability to use independently libraries, catalogues, bibliographies and other reference sources independently, such as EEBO, ECCO, LION, ODNB, and OED, to make appropriate use of the internet, the e-library, the physical library and other libraries; and to find and use suitable editions of literary texts.
The documentation, citation and presentation, according to the MHRA style guide.
Effective skills of communication, including the ability to present sustained and persuasive written and oral arguments; the ability to write fluently in an appropriate academic register and to apply an understanding of the qualities valued in a literary essay (summarised in the English Department document ‘Qualities of a Literary Essay’).
The ability to work with other students through the presentation of ideas and information and collective negotiation.
The ability to acquire substantial quantities of complex information of diverse kinds in a structured and systematic way, to sift and organise material independently and critically, and to evaluate its significance.
Information technology skills that contribute to digital literacy such as word-processing and the acquisition, use and critical evaluation of data in electronic formats.
Time-management and organisational skills, as demonstrated by the ability to plan and perform effectively in unseen examinations, the ability to carry out and present a substantial piece of independent research, and the ability to prioritise one’s work in order to meet set deadlines.
Lectures, tutorials, seminars and workshop discussions (including, at Stage 1 and 2, sessions with explicitly methodological contents and sessions involving individual and group presentations), independent study, close reading of texts, the design and construction of essays and other assessments.
Lectures and seminars (L C, I and H). An individually supervised dissertation at LH.
Peer-review of formative essays and formative presentations.
Exams, essays, coursework exercises, project work (and as part of several modules, group presentations).

Word-processed assessments; evidence of appropriate use of web resources.
Assessment at LC is predominantly by a mix of unseen examination (including MCQs) and assessed essay with an element of assessment by group presentation and group bibliography;

LI assessment is by unseen examination and assessed essay or project;

A major dissertation is a feature of LH, which also offers assessment by extended essay and by seen (pre-release) examination depending on the choice of modules.