Programme And Module Handbook
 
Programme Specification


Date Specification Approved 15/08/2019
College College Arts and Law
School Birmingham Law School
Department Law
Partner College and School Modern Languages
Collaborative Organisation and Form of Collaboration
Qualification and Programme Title LL.B. Law with German Law Full-time
Programme Code 704A
Delivery Location Campus
Language of Study English
Length of Programme 4 Year(s)
Accreditations This programme has no outside accreditations
Aims of the Programme The LLB Law with German Law programme provides a broad education about law and legal processes in England and Wales, the European Union and the constitution of the United Kingdom. It also provides a familiarity with German law in its national context. The programme equips students with knowledge and skills for a variety of careers – including the legal professions, public sector, international and commercial organisations.
Students are exposed to a wide range of approaches to the academic study of law – including analysis of the creation and application of legal rules, the impact of law on individuals, organisations and society, and the moral and political values expressed in law and legal processes. The Law with German Law programme provides opportunities to understand the way the English legal system functions by comparing it with the law of another European country based on a civil law tradition. It also aims to foster a lifelong interest in the legal developments of German-speaking countries. The modules in the Birmingham Law School acquaint students with the German legal system and culture. Through careful preparation in Birmingham students are able to study alongside German people at a German university (in the third year).
In addition to the study of law, the programme develops German language ability at an advanced level which, in addition to the capacity to communicate in German, also includes the capacity to understand cultural context, an increasingly valuable asset for anyone aspiring to participate in the life of European society at a professional level.
The programme provides a supportive environment in which students take responsibility for their own learning and aim to become effective life-long learners, with opportunities to review and reflect on their academic and personal achievements through personal development planning. Through the cumulative nature of law and language studies the programme aims to provide a stimulating learning environment which enables learners with a variety of linguistic and cultural backgrounds to fulfil their potential and develop a capacity for motivated independent and mutually supportive learning.
Programme Outcomes
Students are expected to have Knowledge and Understanding of: Which will be gained through the following Teaching and Learning methods: and assessed using the following methods:
The legal rules, principles and concepts of the "core" branches of law: Public Law (including constitutional law, administrative law and human rights); Law of the European Union; Criminal Law; Civil rights and obligations (including contract, tort and restitution); Property Law.
The main legal institutions and law-making processes in England and Wales and the European Union
The significance of social, political, economic or commercial contexts in which legal rules and principles operate and of ethical issues and dilemmas and legal professional skills which arise for those making law and engaging in legal decision making.
The structure of the German legal system and its historical, legal and political context, the legal profession, the main institutions, the legal sources, including the German federal constitution (the Grundgesetz) and law making processes.
The key elements of German civil law, including the principle of abstraction and the technique of case-solving (Subsumtion).
The methods of comparative law analysis.
A range of other areas of English and German law and legal processes and legal (according to the optional modules taken by the student).
The key features of German contemporary and intellectual life and its social, economic and historical background.
High level of familiarity with accurate written and spoken German and the usage of the appropriate register and German legal terminology
According to the module, one or more of the following: lectures, seminars, individual supervision; Canvas; self-directed reading and thinking; Language exercises; practice written work; peer assessment exercises.
According to the module, one or more of the following: formal examinations; course essays/project work; longer dissertations; continuous assessment in the German language; oral examinations; presentations, group work; reflections on own learning. Informal assessment( not counting towards credits) take place through written assignments in every module.
Students are expected to have attained the following Skills and other Attributes: Which will be gained through the following Teaching and Learning methods: and assessed using the following methods:
Ability to research, identify and locate a range of legal material relating to England and Wales, the European Union and Germany (including legislation, case law and academic commentary) using printed and electronic sources.
Ability to analyse legal material in its national context by:
  • bringing together relevant information;
  • understanding judicial techniques of precedent and statutory interpretation;
  • dealing with and applying problem solving skills to complex facts;
  • judging what is relevant or irrelevant;
  • advising on the application of legal rules to facts in real or hypothetical problems;
  • comparing and evaluating approaches adopted in different legal systems
  • articulating arguments whether in writing or orally in a coherent and logical manner
  • using appropriate methods of research and critical concepts specific to comparative legal systems.

Capability to evaluate and discuss English and German law and law-related material by:
  • synthesising, assessing and critically evaluating arguments;
  • assessing whether significant information is not available or presented in argument;
  • evaluating the impact of law;
  • considering alternative policy options
  • Ability to understand, evaluate and analyse texts and ideas from and about German-speaking countries and to synthesise ideas and develop arguments in German drawing from a range of diverse sources.
  • presenting a reasoned and personal perspective on theoretical and practical issues examined
  • Considering the relevant parts of the law's context

Ability to communicate fluently and effectively with native German speakers both orally and in writing. Ability to study and work with complex texts in German. Ability to reference material written in German
Some basic skills in numeracy (including scepticism about data and the ability to use numerical/statistical data in argument).
Team work skills needed to work effectively as a member of a small group.
Ability to work independently, with limited guidance and supervision, on small scale research projects (including identifying accurately the issues that require research and developing a full academic apparatus (bibliography, referencing) according to English and German academic standards.
Ability to use basic information technology and specialised legal technical resources for legal research and writing (including word-processing, email, the Internet,and electronic databases of legal material) and ability to use self-learning and technology aided learning packages (including WebCT Canvas).
Ability to work and live in another country of the European Union for a limited period of time, adapt to different study circumstances and to develop inter-cultural competence, self-reliance, initiative and flexibility in a different cultural environment.
Some basic skills in numeracy (including scepticism about data and the ability to use numerical/statistical data in argument)
Ability to monitor, reflect and build upon learning experiences and plan for personal and career development
According to the module, one or more of the following: Lectures; seminars; individual supervision; Canvas; self-directed reading and thinking; training sessions in the use of information technology for legal research and writing; practice written work; peer assessment exercises. Progress reviews with personal tutor; CEPLER Professional Development Scheme; personal study; reflecting on implications of individual feedback on formative work; reflecting on individual and generic feedback on summative assessment
According to the module, one or more of the following: formal examinations; course essays/project work; presentations; group work; reflections on own learning; continuous assessment in German language; longer dissertations; oral examinations. Informal assessment (not counting toward credit) takes place through written assignments in every module.