Programme And Module Handbook
 
Programme Specification


Date Specification Approved 15/11/2020
College College Arts and Law
School Lan, Cult, Art Hist & Music
Department Modern Languages
Partner College and School History
Collaborative Organisation and Form of Collaboration
Qualification and Programme Title B.A. Modern Languages and History Full-time
Programme Code 421D
Delivery Location Campus
Language of Study English
Length of Programme 4 Year(s)
Accreditations This programme has no outside accreditations
Aims of the Programme "To enable students to achieve the appropriate level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (specified by language under Learning Outcomes) through the systematic integration of language and content teaching. To enable students to explain and assess critically the multi-disciplinary features and significance of the culture, history and society of their chosen language communities. To enable students to be digitally literate. Students will be able to use appropriate, up-to-date technology in the effective learning of languages and to understand works of culture (understood in the broadest sense, to include history, society, politics, and other material covered in modules aligned with the Birmingham Languages Graduate). To enable students to handle and analyse material relating to research projects based in the Department of Modern Languages. To enable students to engage with appropriately adapted questions derived from research projects based in the Department of Modern Languages. To enable students to become effective independent learners, with regular opportunities to develop skills in research, academic writing, and reflective learning. To enable students to be competitively employable through the acquisition of direct and transferable skills as well as through: 1) appropriate integration of Modern Languages careers topics within core modules; 2) optional placement opportunities relating to Modern Languages (credit-bearing and non-credit-bearing); 3) non-credit bearing Modern Languages careers events. To enable students to give a persuasive account of their degree and of why they have assembled their degree in a particular way. To provide students with language and language-related transferable skills useful in a range of contexts, both educational and professional; and to respond to national and international needs for advanced strategic competence in a variety of world languages. To enable students to acquire first-hand experience of living and studying and/or working abroad. To enable students to develop a wide range of transferable skills, including the assimilation, analysis, organisation and synthesis of information and its effective communication in speech and writing, through the study of complex material, which can be applied in a variety of educational and professional contexts, thereby meeting a national and international need for competence in modern foreign languages. Special features of the programme: The combined study of History with study of a broad range of cultural, historical and social topics related to one of the languages currently taught by the department of Modern Languages. The History programme aims to enhance students? knowledge and understanding of historical events and processes, as well as to develop analytical and critical capacities of a high order. Though the programme concentrates on medieval and modern Europe including Britain and Ireland (c.400-c.2000), considerable attention is also paid to global history, particularly that of Asia, Africa and North America. Students undertake as many modules of practical language work as Single Honours students, but they take fewer cultural, historical or social modules and instead take modules in History. They are expected to reach the same standards as Single Honours students in the modules that they follow. Languages that can be studied include: French; Spanish; German; Russian; A compulsory period of residence abroad. With effect from the 16/17 cohort, the weighting of the year abroad will be 6.25%, with the corollary that year 2 will weigh 18.75%. "
Programme Outcomes
Students are expected to have Knowledge and Understanding of: Which will be gained through the following Teaching and Learning methods: and assessed using the following methods:
"The advanced strategic usage of one modern language, including the linguistic structures of the language. By final year students of French, German, Spanish and Russian should have achieved at least C1 level and normally C2 level within the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

Students should be able to select and use appropriate, up-to-date technology in the effective learning of languages. "
"The features and significance of the culture, history and society of their chosen language communities. Students should be able to use appropriate, up-to-date technology in such understanding.

Dependent on the range of optional modules offered, specialised further topics within Modern Languages such as translation, interpreting, politics, linguistics, cinema, history, society or culture. "
Key methods and concepts used in the analysis of a range of fields relating to language and culture.
"Advanced knowledge of the society and culture of the countries where the language is spoken.

The significance of language and languages to our connections to other peoples and places around the globe, and in our own lives. This understanding will (a) span multiple disciplines and (b) extend across times, places, and identities, including with regards to:
  • The historical and contemporary significance of different languages and cultures
  • Cultural responses to the urgent human problems of history and the contemporary period, and to the human condition more widely
"
The primary trends in the political, social, economic, cultural and religious development of western Europe during the medieval and/or modern periods;
A body of historical information characterised by geographical range and chronological depth with special attention to Europe and the wider world
A range of sources available to historians (including textual primary evidence) and an awareness of their limitations;
The historiographical development of core debates in history, and an appreciation of the reasons for continued controversies;
The core analytical skills deployed by historians, including skills of interpretation, corroboration and evaluation;
Conceptual, theoretical and ideological influences on historical events and on their interpretation, with particular emphasis on political, cultural and socio-economic development.
"1. Material is developed and delivered by a combination of native and non-native teaching staff, and involving a wide range of registers, contexts and modes (e.g. journalistic, literary, colloquial, translation, correspondence, administration) as well as unassessed assignments. Beginners follow an expanded, intensive course of language study. Extensive supporting material is available through Canvas and self-access facilities on the main campus. The Year Abroad provides students with the opportunity for a period of immersion in the language(s) studied.

Specialised core modules in all years, taught through the integration of language and content teaching involving plenaries and target language seminars and classes. The use of language learning technology is built in to all new core modules offered in Modern Languages.

2. Plenaries, seminars, tutorials, project supervision, guided and independent reading.

All core modules in Modern Languages. This learning outcome is a key criterion through which optional modules can also align with the BLG curriculum. Teaching and learning methods include particularly plenaries, seminars, tutorials, project supervision, guided and independent reading.

3. Plenaries, seminars, tutorials, project supervision, guided and independent reading.

All core modules in Modern Languages. This learning outcome is a key criterion through which optional modules can also align with the BLG curriculum. Teaching and learning methods particularly include plenaries.

4. Plenaries, seminars, tutorials, project supervision, language classes, guided and independent reading. Also through residence abroad.

All core modules in Modern Languages. This learning outcome is a key criterion through which optional modules can also align with the BLG curriculum. Teaching and learning methods include particularly plenaries, seminars, tutorials, project supervision, guided and independent reading.

5. Lectures, seminars, group research projects and virtual learning environments

6. Lectures, seminars, group research projects and virtual learning environments

7. Lectures, seminars, group research projects and virtual learning environments

8. Lectures, seminars, group research projects and virtual learning environments

9. Lectures, seminars, group research projects and virtual learning environments

10. Lectures, seminars, group research projects and virtual learning environments. "
"1. Unseen written examinations, assessed coursework, essays, oral and aural examinations, tasks undertaken under timed conditions, assessments completed during the Year Abroad, and dissertation work including 20 credits of Independent Study.

Target language projects and e-assessment portfolios. Formative e- assessments and student-led research.

2. Coursework (essays, dissertation, project work, oral presentations, target language projects, e-assessment portfolios), unseen written examinations, oral/aural examinations. Formative e-assessments and student-led research.

3. Coursework (essays, dissertation, project work, oral presentations, target language projects, e-assessment portfolios), unseen written examinations, oral/aural examinations.

4. Coursework (essays, dissertation, project work, oral presentations, target language projects, e-assessment portfolios), unseen written examinations, oral/aural examinations. Formative e-assessments and student-led research.

5. Written formative and summative coursework of varying length and type, from short source exercises to essays of up to 3000 words each; unseen timed examinations; collaborative and/or individual research projects

6. Written formative and summative coursework of varying length and type, from short source exercises to essays of up to 3000 words each; unseen timed examinations; collaborative and/or individual research projects

7. Written formative and summative coursework of varying length and type, from short source exercises to essays of up to 3000 words each; unseen timed examinations; collaborative and/or individual research projects

8. Written formative and summative coursework of varying length and type, from short source exercises to essays of up to 3000 words each; unseen timed examinations;

9. Written formative and summative coursework of varying length and type, from short source exercises to essays of up to 3000 words each; unseen timed examinations; collaborative and/or individual research projects

10. Written formative and summative coursework of varying length and type, from short source exercises to essays of up to 3000 words each; unseen timed examinations; collaborative and/or individual research projects "
Students are expected to have attained the following Skills and other Attributes: Which will be gained through the following Teaching and Learning methods: and assessed using the following methods:
This information is to be supplied 1. Attendance at plenaries, reading and contribution to seminars and tutorials, regular written exercises. Use of the University Library, IT and other information sources.

2. Target language seminars combined with extensive reading and other forms of exposure to and practice in the target language(s). Residence abroad. Attendance at plenaries, reading and contribution to seminars and tutorials, regular written exercises. Use of the University Library, IT and other information sources. Attendance at plenaries, reading and contribution to seminars and tutorials, regular written exercises. Use of the University Library, IT and other information sources.

3. By definition, language work and content modules involve new, `difficult? material that requires the independent application and ownership of techniques taught in classes and lectures if it is to be understood fully and mastered. An emphasis on close analysis is intended to broaden the range and sophistication of students? interpretations of material, and to allow students to produce not so much expositions as substantiated arguments and positions. Problem Based Learning (PBL) exercises, presentations, group project work and other forms of independent learning are germane to all parts of the programme. The Year Abroad offers a particular opportunity for the development of independent capability, personally as well as linguistically and intellectually. A range of formative assessment modes are used throughout the degree.

4. Coverage of Modern Languages professions is built into all core language modules. Opportunities for work experience may be acquired through non-credit bearing summer placements (Year 2) and/ or placements followed during the Year Abroad.

5. Target language seminars combined with extensive reading and other forms of exposure to and practice in the target language(s). Residence abroad. Attendance at plenaries, reading and contribution to seminars and tutorials, regular written exercises. Coverage of Modern Languages professions is built into all core language modules. Opportunities for work experience may be acquired through non-credit bearing summer placements (Year 2) and/ or placements followed during the Year Abroad.

6. Residence abroad

7. Target language seminars combined with extensive reading and other forms of exposure to and practice in the target language(s). Residence abroad. Attendance at lectures, reading and contribution to seminars and tutorials, regular written exercises. Use of the University Library, IT and other information sources.

8. Target language seminars combined with extensive reading and other forms of exposure to and practice in the target language(s). Attendance at lectures, reading and contribution to seminars and tutorials, regular written exercises. Use of the University Library, IT and other information sources.

9. Lectures, seminars, virtual learning environments

10. Lectures, seminars, group research projects and virtual learning environments

11. Lectures, seminars, virtual learning environments

12- 13. Lectures, seminars, group research projects and virtual learning environments

14. Lectures, seminars, virtual learning environments

15-16. Lectures, seminars, group research projects and virtual learning environments

17. group research projects and dissertations

18-20. Lectures, seminars, group research projects and virtual learning environments

21. Lectures, seminars, group research projects, dissertations and virtual learning environments

22. group research projects

23-25. Lectures, seminars, group research projects and virtual learning environments

26. Lectures, seminars, and virtual learning environments

27. group research projects

28-29. Lectures, seminars, group research projects and virtual learning environments.
1-5. Coursework (essays, dissertation, project work, oral presentations, target language projects, e-assessment portfolios), unseen written examinations, oral/aural examinations. Formative e-assessments and student-led research.

6. Year Abroad coursework

7-8. Coursework (essays, dissertation, project work, oral presentations, target language projects, e-assessment portfolios), unseen written examinations, oral/aural examinations. Formative e-assessments and student-led research.

9. Written formative and summative coursework of varying length and type, from short source exercises to essays of up to 3000 words each; unseen timed examinations

10. Written formative and summative coursework of varying length and type, from short source exercises to essays of up to 3000 words each; unseen timed examinations; collaborative and/or individual research projects

11. Written formative and summative coursework of varying length and type, from short source exercises to essays of up to 3000 words each; unseen timed examinations

12-13. Written formative and summative coursework of varying length and type, from short source exercises to essays of up to 3000 words each; unseen timed examinations; collaborative and/or individual research projects

14. Written formative and summative coursework of varying length and type, from short source exercises to essays of up to 3000 words each; unseen timed examinations;

15-16. Written formative and summative coursework of varying length and type, from short source exercises to essays of up to 3000 words each; unseen timed examinations; collaborative and/or individual research projects

17. collaborative and/or individual research projects

18. Written formative and summative coursework of varying length and type, from short source exercises to essays of up to 3000 words each; unseen timed examinations; collaborative research projects

19-21. Written formative and summative coursework of varying length and type, from short source exercises to essays of up to 3000 words each; unseen timed examinations; collaborative and/or individual research projects

22. collaborative research projects

23. Written formative and summative coursework of varying length and type, from short source exercises to essays of up to 3000 words each; unseen timed examinations; collaborative research projects

24-25. Written formative and summative coursework of varying length and type, from short source exercises to essays of up to 3000 words each; unseen timed examinations; collaborative and/or individual research projects

26. Written formative and summative coursework of varying length and type, from short source exercises to essays of up to 3000 words each; unseen timed examinations;

27. collaborative research projects

28-29. Written formative and summative coursework of varying length and type, from short source exercises to essays of up to 3000 words each; unseen timed examinations; collaborative and/or individual research projects