Programme And Module Handbook
 
Programme Specification


Date Specification Approved 27/07/2017
College College Arts and Law
School Phil, Theology and Religion
Department Theology and Religion
Partner College and School Political Sci & Intern'tl Stud
Collaborative Organisation and Form of Collaboration
Qualification and Programme Title B.A. Politics, Religion and Philosophy Full-time
Programme Code 238A
Delivery Location Campus
Language of Study English
Length of Programme 3 Year(s)
Accreditations This programme has no outside accreditations
Aims of the Programme Overall

As a Single Honours programme, this BA programme seeks to bring together the three elements of Religion, Politics and Philosophy to facilitate student learning and enquiry into three important dimensions of public and private life: critical philosophical enquiry, political thinking and contemporary issues in religion and the relations between religions. While students will be free to develop their specific and discrete interests and skills in these three areas, the overall programme will also seek to nurture a debate and critical discussion in-between the disciplines. This will be facilitated through regular seminar discussion groups throughout the whole programme that seek to generate cross-disciplinary critical reflection. In order to reinforce the coherence of the student experience, the programme will be ‘hosted’ and managed (in terms of timetabling and student guidance and support) by just one Department: Theology and Religion. Students will be equipped to critically reflect on the place of religion in wider society, the political theories, powers and practices that have formed communities, and the philosophical thinking that continues to challenge private and public assumptions and practices.

Stage I
This stage is divided equally between core and optional elements. The core elements of this stage are selected from Year One elements in each of the three disciplines’ Single Hons programmes. They introduce students to the broad foundational aspects. All students are required to attend special ‘PRP Seminars’ that seek to generate cross-disciplinary critical reflection. (For PRP students, these seminars will be an integral part of the Introduction to the Study of Religion module (09 20271), requiring a minimum 70% attendance.

Stage II
As with Stage I, the structure of this stage is divided into two equal parts - compulsory and optional elements. However, the core elements seek to go beyond the broad foundations of Stage I and focus on aspects that bring the three disciplines together: contemporary political, philosophical and social thought and the place of religion in the public sphere. All students are required to attend special ‘PRP Seminars’ that seek to generate cross-disciplinary critical reflection. (For PRP students, these seminars will be an integral part of the Religion and the Public Square module, requiring a minimum 70% attendance).

Towards the end of the stage, students may elect to begin work on the Level H module, Philosophical Project and through a programme of lectures, seminars and workshops connected to this, they will further consolidate their analytical, presentational and team working skills.

Stage III
The core elements of this stage allows students to specialise and engage in their own independent study by choosing a dissertation/project module from one of the three disciplines. This stage also permits students greater optional choices (which allows students to focus on one of the disciplines more than the others if desired). All students are required to attend special ‘PRP Seminars’ that seek to generate cross-disciplinary critical reflection.

From 2015/16, Stage III students who at Stage II opted for Philosophical Project will write a 6000 word dissertation, and this undertaking should, even more than the other modules at this level, help them to refine the research, analytical and presentational skills that characterize the programme as a whole.
Programme Outcomes
Students are expected to have Knowledge and Understanding of: Which will be gained through the following Teaching and Learning methods: and assessed using the following methods:
the place of religion in wider society, the political theories, powers and practices that have formed communities, and the philosophical thinking that continues to challenge private and public assumptions and practices.
the broad range and historical development of political thought, and the scope and contested nature of politics and political science.
A range of techniques of philosophical reasoning, and how those techniques are brought to bear on philosophical theories and problems.
some theories and arguments that are the subject of current research in contemporary analytical philosophy
some of the major issues and controversies relating to theology and religion and the ways in which theologians and communities have responded to these issues in different periods and social and geographical settings.
Lectures, seminar discussions, close, active reading of texts, critical thinking, the design and construction of essays and other assessments.
Essays, examinations, extended essays; dissertations, group presentations, group and plenary discussions
Students are expected to have attained the following Skills and other Attributes: Which will be gained through the following Teaching and Learning methods: and assessed using the following methods:
The ability to construct a critical argument and present this effectively in written and/or oral form
the ability to work independently, including devising and researching a piece of writing in theology, politics or philosophy.
The ability to think effectively and cohesively in the context of multi-disciplinarity.
The ability to present information effectively and to be competent and effective users of IT resources for research purposes, word processing and communication.
Lectures, class discussion in seminars and lectures, independent study
Assessed essays, dissertation writing as a result of student-led, enquiry-based learning; Word-processed assessments; individual or group presentations for certain modules, student-led discussion in seminars, evidence of appropriate use of web resources.